Posts tagged ‘Weng Chan’

alternate Action 642 – Green Lantern/Superman – Legend of the Green Flame


I made an error earlier, I said this was intended for Action 635.  In fact, it was for 642.  I had assumed it was the earlier of the two crossover issues, simply based on the line-up that appears in the story – none of the post-635 series are included.  But the ending makes it clear that it was for the latter issue.

Neil Gaiman’s script was rejected by John Byrne.  At the time, it was a hard and fast rule that no one knew Superman’s identity, and Gaiman insisted on the characters meeting as Clark and Hal.  Neither would budge, and the script got set aside.  The story was finally published in 2001.

This special also has a large art team, divided chapter by chapter.  Eddie Campbell, Mark Buckingham, John Totleben, Jim Aparo, Kevin Nowlan, Jaosn Little, Michael Allred, Eric Shanower, Terry Austin and Arthur Adams.


The story begins with a prologue in Berlin, shortly after the end of World War II.  Blackhawks Janos Prohaska and Weng Chan go rooting through rubble, searching for a lost weapon.  They come across the remains of the Justice Society of America, although they do not realize who these people are.  We see Sandman, and the remains of Hawkman’s wings, but it’s Alan Scott’s lantern that grabs Weng’s interest, and he takes it with him.


Jumping to the present day, Hal is feeling lost and alone, and turns to Clark for a shoulder to cry on.  Lois Lane wrangles the two into attending a gallery opening that night.


Catwoman makes a cameo, running into Hal.  But the catkin emerald she was interested in is not there, so Selina leaves.  Exploring the gallery, Hal comes across the lantern, on display.  He is fascinated.  It’s a Green Lantern lantern, but not one he recognizes.  He uses his ring to scan it.


Bad idea.


Deadman comes across the confused heroes, and tells them they are dead.  They aren’t.  Not quite.  But they have been pulled into the magical, somewhat sentient flame that powers Alan Scott’s lantern, and are between being alive and dead.


The Flame’s burst of energy draws the attention of the Phantom Stranger.


He convinces Hal that he does have the willpower to tame the wild magic of the flame, and get it back into its battery, dormant.


The final page makes it clear that this was intended for issue 642.  The story printed there uses a similar marquee in its background.


Action 635 – Superman, Green Lantern, Black Canary and Blackhawk fight a dictator with too much power, and Green Lantern ends


Action 635 features a big crossover story, as well as the final chapter of the Green Lantern series, and another two pages of Superman.  Neil Gaiman had written a story for this issue, but a disagreement with John Byrne lead to it being set aside, and this one, by Mark Verheiden, with art by Eduardo Barreto and John Nyberg.

The story by Gaiman was printed, many years later, as a Green Lantern/Superman Special.  But it is very much an Action Comics Weekly story, with a number of cameos.  I’m sooo close to the end of my media library, and also of Action Comics Weekly.  And I debated writing about the Gaiman story here, or at its publication date.

So I am letting the media library decide.  If I reach the end of Action Comics Weekly and have space, I will make my final entry on this blog about Gaiman’s version.


The story they printed is servicable, but nothing special.  Weng Chan is flying Blackhawk Express, the delivery company the Blackhawks became.  On the flight is Clay, Hal’s old friend from his days at Ferris Aircraft, along with an experimental engine.  A south Asian dictator has shot down the plane, and taken them prisoner.


Hal is having dinner with Dinah Lance, and discussing their lives and problems, when he hears from Clay’s wife.


Here’s the dictator.  Nasty looking man.


Hal decides to set out as Green Lantern to rescue him, and Dinah comes along as Black Canary.


Using the engine, the dictator takes control of a giant purple energy monster.  News of this reaches Superman, who comes flying to investigate.  He and Green Lantern battle the monster and keep it busy.


Black Canary rescues Weng, and they get to the computer controls.


It’s Weng who figures out the solution.  Unplug the machine.


Owsley, Bright and Tanghal end Green Lantern’s run as they have produced it all along, with great art and dangling plot threads.

Malvolio has a long fight with Green Lantern, but the end reveals that nothing we have seen is real, so perhaps nothing Malvolio said is true.  Who is this mysterious man?

No one knows.  We never see him again.  The Green Lantern series that launches shortly leaves all this in the astral dust.


Action 621 – Hal gets a new job, Wild Pup gets it in the shoulder, the Secret Six get on the case, Deadman gets stuck, and Weng Chan gets crazy


A nice Blackhawk cover on Action 621.


Hal Jordan begins a new job as a test pilots with the Gremlins in this story by Owsley, MD Bright and Jose Marzan.  The Gremlins were introduced a few weeks earlier in Green Lantern’s story in Secret Origins.


As the Green Lantern ring automatically protects one from injury, Hal does not feel he can accurately do his job with it on, and leaves it behind.


He almost regrets it, but the scene demonstrates his flying skills.


When he returns to get his ring, his battery explodes.


Wild Dog goes after the Night Slasher in this chapter, by Collins, Rockwell and Nyberg.  And though he does not realize it, Wild Pup is right behind him.


This time, Wild Pup does not help out, he just gets stabbed.


Pasko, Springer and McLaughlin continue with the Secret Six, as they begin their next mission, one involving academia.


Mockingbird no longer seems to be keeping such close tabs on the new group, as they begin to actively research their dead predecessors.


Deadman has a harder time of things than he expected, in this chapter by Baron, Jones and DeZuniga.


Deadman gets stuck in the body of LeGros, while the twins are possessed by the spirits of twin voodoo queens, long dead.  Madame Waxahachie knows what is going on, but is hard pressed to help.


Weng Chan gets the impressive stuff in this Pasko/Burchett chapter of Blackhawk.  He is being tortured, steamed to death slowly, along with the bulk of the team.


Janos is busy messing around with the aviatrix, as Weng risks a severely sliced face to free himself, and the rest of the group.


Action 617 – Green Lantern has relationship problems, Fredrikson shows up, Wild Pup isn’t wanted, Superman loses his man, the Phantom Stranger and channelling, and Cheshire loses custody


Superman streamlines across the cover of Action 617.


David, Howell and Starr continue the Hawkes storyline in this issue, but open as a rift grows in the relationship between Hal and Arisia.


She may look like an adult, but Arisia is really a child, who used her ring to rapidly age her body.  So it’s not surprising when her behaviour tends towards childishness.


The Freakshow lays a trap for Green Lantern, with a pyrokinetic woman pretending to be endangered by the flames.


Castle is now wearing a costume, instead of jogging gear.  Not a bad assortment of enemies.


Pasko and Burchett get the team together in this chapter of Blackhawk.


Although the mission itself, to rescue the downed aviatrix, is not that appealing, the down payment is.


We do know that the woman is being held captive by a plantation owner, and is being tortured for information.


Frederkison shows up, and Janos thinks he is responsible for Lady Blackhawk’s loss of an eye, as they had once been a couple.  He’s wrong, but the two men fight anyway.


Wild Dog meets his acolyte in this chapter, by Collins, Beatty and Nyberg.


The boy does prove useful, but Wild Dog is not in any way pleased by his help, and wants nothing to do with the boy.


People keep trying to kill the Superman worshipper, and Superman has been dealing with those men.  He is none too pleased to discover his worshipper is not where he is supposed to be.

Yes, seriously, that is all that has happened since my last entry on this Stern, Swan and Anderson strip.


Kupperberg is joined by Joe Orlando and Fred Carillo on this Phantom Stranger story, which deals with channelling, the 80s fad in which psychics would get possessed by a spirit from a past life.


The medium actually manages to evoke an Atlantean warlord, who runs wild in the streets.


The Stranger manages to convince the warrior that he is in the wrong time, calm him down and send him back.


The story has a nicely cynical ending, the psychic has learned nothing from the events, and simply intends to exploit it for her own benefit.


Wolfman, Patton and Poston continue with the Nightwing an Speedy tale.  Nightwing gets the best of Cheshire in their pub fight, and the assassin takes off


Cheshire returns home to find Roy captive.  She is about to kill him when Nightwing bursts in for another round.


Cheshire flees, rather than get caught, but in doing so she leaves Lian behind, and Roy winds up with his daughter for the first time.



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